Three Plans On The Table For New Park at Devereux Meadow

The city held a virtual open house in May, 2021 about a future urban park at the Devereux Meadow site. The site sits just north of Peace Street directly west of Capital Boulevard. It’s currently being used to store city vehicles but that will all be moved soon. Jump into the video above for the full 2-hour details, or 1 hour and 20 min if you watch it at 1.5x speed, the preferred watching speed here at DTRaleigh HQ.

You can also check out the project page on the city’s website for the slides and contact information: Devereux Meadow Project

There’s even a survey for you to fill out.

Devereux Meadow has popped in and out of the blog over the years as the site has been mentioned for future plans going back all the way to a 2011 Capital Boulevard Corridor study. That street is well documented on this site and I even have a post up about the baseball field that was built in 1938 right next to Capital. Finally, the Devereux Meadow site has been planned to become a park as part of the 2015 Downtown Plan which I covered here.

The session and presentation is quite nice and in addition contains some history. Even more history can be watched in an additional video.

Getting back to the present, the plans for the urban park are starting to materialize as the city is in the process of finalizing the schematic design. The construction of the park itself is still unfunded but could be on a future, this year even, parks bond.

The team is presenting three concepts for your review and I’d like to share each one below. The main points of each plan address the Pigeon House Branch creek in different ways and I think everything else kind of reacts around it.

Line Drive

The Line Drive concept is the first one in the list and does the least, relatively, to the creek compared to the other two plans. The creek “is stabilized in place, with stream shelf and instream structures to promote floodplain connectivity and bedform diversity.” A portion of the creek that is currently covered in concrete would remain.

This plans comes in as the cheapest and the report sums up how it stacks up against the rest with:

“Stabilization in place of the current stream. Aqueduct, site access road and Dortch Street culverts remain, leaving no room for stream alignment or grade manipulation. Incorporation of a stream shelf promotes floodplain connectivity, and instream structures develop bedform diversity. Lowest cost, lowest ecological uplift.”

Sculpt

The Sculpt concept is the “middle” option, for lack of a better word, as this one has some work being done to the stream and the cost is in-between the other two. This plan opens up the creek a bit as that concrete cap on the southern end is removed. The creek “is restored in place, with increased stream bench and instream structures for greater habitat and flood capacity and bedform diversity.”

The high-level states:

“Removal of the concrete cap over the aqueduct and limited manipulation of the stream alignment and profile. Increased extent of stream bench for greater habitat and flood capacity. Instream structures develop bedform diversity. Moderate cost, moderate ecological uplift.”

Meander

Meander would offer the most significant transformation. As you can see, the stream is practically reconfigured on the site and would offer flowing walking paths alongside. In this plan, “Pigeon House Branch is realigned, with stream and floodplain designed to maximize floodplain connection, habitat health and visitor interaction.”

There’s also the most opportunities for programming and public uses of the space. As the report states:

“Total relocation of the stream alignment and profile. Stream and floodplain design are based on bankfull hydrology and maximize floodplain connection and function. Greatest potential for visitor interaction, diverse habitat communities, and incorporation of stormwater treatment. Highest cost, highest ecological uplift.”

Which one do you like? Make sure and take the survey and give the city your thoughts.

For me, I go back and forth between Sculpt and Meander but I think Sculpt gets my vote. There’s a line of oak trees, referred to as the Oak AllĂ©e, on the western side where new oaks would be planted as part of Sculpt. The other two plans don’t have that. In addition to opening up the stream on both plans, this just seems like a nice element to have in the future, once the new oaks mature.

Finally, I have to share some old photos I took when I lurked around the area in 2012. You can see the concrete cap over the creek and some of the oak trees. These are around the southwestern side of the site.

What positives or negatives do you see? Come over to the Community and discuss it with us.

400 Apartments and Retail planned for West Morgan Street

Plans for more apartments popped up on the city’s website, this time on the 800 block of West Morgan Street. The sites are mostly empty now, parking lots really, except for the building that the Goodnights Comedy Club currently occupies. The plans would lead to the demolition of that existing building.

In the future, around 400 apartments and ground-floor retail would be built. You can see an artist’s rendering of the project above. The site is a little more interesting with it being along that “curve” where Morgan shortly travels North/South and then changes to East/West.

Articles are stating that Goodnights is looking for a new home which is good to hear. Let’s hope they stick to downtown Raleigh.

It’s unfortunate that a building in downtown with a more interesting facade couldn’t be saved or incorporated into the new development. Even just saving the front doesn’t seem to be in the plans but we’ll have to wait and see. Raleigh doesn’t seem to have a track record of doing that kind of thing too much, although there are some examples. See the Lumsden Bros. Building as well as the nearby Raleigh Industrial Bank Renovation.

I still see a lot of positives here with a future with 400 apartments and more retail spaces along a walkable, urban street. The development is still in the early phases at this time and I’m not aware of a zoning request either. The Goodnight’s property is zoned for seven stories max while the adjacent lot along the Morgan Street “curve” is capped at four.

Dog Park and Bar proposed for 504 Hillsborough

Some real fun plans were announced for the land at 504 Hillsborough Street. A dog park with outdoor bar was announced by those behind CityPlat, the new owners of the property.

Used as a parking lot for years, probably decades, the triangle-shaped lot where Edenton merges with Hillsborough will soon have drinks served out of shipping containers around a dog-friendly outdoor space.

Coming soon to the intersection of West Street and Edenton in downtown Raleigh is a DOG PARK & BAR complete with concession (think coffee, beer), retail, and a large play area for dogs to roam around. Picture an open and welcoming, community-focused space for dog owners and dog lovers alike to connect and play fetch, right in the heart of the city.

Gaurav “G” Patel on LinkedIn

I’ve been watching that site for years and finally, someone comes in with a very unique, very cool idea for it. The trees are mature enough to make the space feel cozy but open enough that you’re able to people watch as if you’re in a park.

Let’s hope this drops into place by the Spring.

RUS Bus Update Teases Us 30% of the Time with Renderings

Rendering from Perkins – Eastman – link

At a GoTriangle Board meeting this week, there were updates related to RUS Bus that show off some high level updates including a 30% schematic design. For those new to the project, RUS Bus is an extension for Raleigh Union Station (RUS) including a mixed-use development with a bus station on the ground floor.

Located right next to Raleigh Union Station, serving train passengers today and possibly commuter rail passengers in the future, the bus component would be the more local transit connection. It’ll most likely have a bus rapid transit stop as well.

Finally, being in the warehouse district, the location would bring a hub of activity to the west side of downtown. I’ve got lots of love for a project like this, which should come as no surprise to long-time readers.

There are more renderings on the architect’s website, showing preliminary designs which look fantastic, but for me, I’m most interested at this time in the preliminary site plan shown below.

The ground-floor of developments typically interest me because that’s probably what most people are going to use anyway. Some interesting elements I see include:

  • A bridge directly connecting RUS bus to RUS.
  • Lots of ground floor mixed-use spaces.
  • A big connection directly into the current civic plaza.

There’s a lot of function shown here along with elements that could elevate the entire transit station into a destination. If you look at the rendering with towers on top, this could be a pretty nice hub of activity at all times of the day, on weekdays and weekends also.

From the GoTriangle board meeting agenda, we also have some dates.

Planned Construction start date: April 30, 2022

Substantial Completion Date: June 30, 2025

Grant funds must be fully drawn: September 30, 2025

The 2020s will be a big year for transit investments in Raleigh.

Oakwood and the North-South Freeway

Personal Note: I’ve wanted to get this post up for the longest time and am finally getting around to it! I felt this would be a good time for a historical piece as there is a lot to dive into. You should come back and take a look at the included documents at your leisure as they have some great reading. I’m checking out until the new year but as always, the chatter on the Community never stops.

One of my most enjoyable walking routes near downtown is a stroll up and down North East and North Bloodworth street, mainly through the Oakwood neighborhood. The trees are mature and their presence makes the streets feel cozy. The houses are rich with architecture. I find new and delightful details on every walk it seems.

This section of town offers a lot of history including the possibility of being completely demolished for a highway. Yes, a highway could have been placed along the properties between Bloodworth and East Streets if planners and traffic engineers had their way in the early 1970s.

Raleigh history fans probably already know about this possible highway through Oakwood but I’ve always wanted to dive into those plans for myself. It was a pretty substantial component of a State Government vision for the future.

A vision that never came to be.

You can take a look at the 89-page, 1965 document (pdf format) for yourself as the text and images are fascinating to look at.

In 1958, a State Capital Planning Commission was established to work on plans for a state government complex in downtown Raleigh. A highlight of their work was the 1965 North Carolina State Capital Plan and in its opening letter, Chairman O. Arthur Kirkman states:

This report is the result of two years’ work by the Commission and its consultants. We are confident that it provides the State with an unparalleled opportunity to develop a magnificent State Capital in keeping with our heritage. We hope that you and the citizens of the State will give the recommendations which follow your deepest consideration and support.

The document was only meant to be an advisory plan rather than actual plan for implementation. State, as well as local elected officials, spent years reviewing and critiquing the plans.

The State Capital complex vision was a pretty stark difference compared to what we have today. Instead of buildings and parking decks along a, more or less, urban grid, the vision involved something you would see in Research Triangle Park. (RTP)

Buildings would be connected with winding walkways. You’d see bridges over lakes and streams. Access would be underground with no streets inside the campus. Decorating the campus would be plazas, fountains, and terraces.

The historic street grid of Raleigh would essentially be removed in exchange for open grassy fields and surface parking lots.

You can see a model of the plan in this rendering below.

It almost seems like the plan was trying to correct a perceived problem with how Raleigh was originally planned and how that plan could no longer accommodate our city’s current and future growth. The original plan for Raleigh, the William Christmas plan, consisted of a grid of streets with five main squares. This plan is still mostly intact in downtown leading up to the 1960s.

From the document:

The often short-sighted steps taken to meet the problems of growth and changing conditions have done great damage to what has remained of the vision of the city’s founders. Intelligent planning can, however, recover much that was lost and provide for orderly, meaningful growth in the future.

The 1965 plan includes many phases of how to acquire land and roll out these concepts so that by the year 2000, there would be a full build out of the government campus.

What makes this document interesting are some of the assumptions and projections made back in 1965. I feel that some still apply today where some are up for debate. How might this have affected downtown Raleigh if even a small portion of the plan was put into place?

The section titled “Future Needs” has some great projections leading up to the year 2000. It makes sense that one of the first things to mention is the growth of the state government employee population.

In 1840 there were but fifteen State employees, exclusive of the General Assembly, all housed in the Capitol building. In 1926 there were approximately 700 persons in State administrative agencies in Raleigh. In 1963 there were more than 5,600 and there can be no doubt that as the population of North Carolina grows, the State will take on many new responsibilities.

By the year 2000, the report estimated that there would be 15,663 state government jobs in Raleigh. I pulled up a 2014 State of Downtown Raleigh report from the Downtown Raleigh Alliance and according to their estimates, the State of North Carolina had 13,000 employees. So we’re not there just yet.

Another interesting prediction was around transportation. The document clearly identifies the dependence on the car to get around the city but predicted alternatives in the future.

Although the automobile is now a prime means of transportation, this will not necessarily be true by the year 2000. Raleigh at present is heavily committed to the automobile and could not now exist without it. In the future, however, the prime means of access to the central city will probably be some combination of private vehicles and mass transportation. Although the foreseeable population levels and densities probably will not justify a rapid transit system, this possibility should be kept in mind. Concentration of employment as proposed in the State Capital Center plan is favorable to mass transit, and similar concentrations along corridors of travel may some day justify a means of transportation other than the automobile. The study now under way may well set some guidelines for the future in this respect.

Attached to this section is a map of mass transit routes that may be possible in the year 2000. I can’t help but laugh a bit seeing this prediction as we are underway now planning a bus-rapid transit system along the very same lines drawn in each cardinal direction outward from downtown Raleigh.

The document mentions that the roads in Raleigh in 1965 were “currently operating at or near capacity during rush hours.” This was seen as a barrier for future growth. “Obviously, this system as it now exists will be able to accommodate little future growth.”

Obviously.

This is the part of the story where the famed freeway through Oakwood comes into play. To alleviate congestion seen on the north side of downtown on Capital Boulevard, then named Downtown Boulevard, some kind of connection was needed on the eastern side.

The proposed highway would go through the neighborhoods of Mordecai and Oakwood. It would start with a connection to Wade Avenue on the north and proceed south to Hammond Road, at present day I-40 through the Chavis Heights and South Park neighborhoods.

The highway was envisioned to be built below grade with cross streets bridging over it.

The freeway is depressed below grade at most points to diminish the detrimental effects of noise and glare on the adjacent land. Such a highway is a major gateway to the city and should be given exceptional design attention. Bridges and other structures should be graceful and the landscape attractive, providing shade, protection from glare, and a pleasant setting. Signs and lighting should be carefully and tastefully designed. Land use along the freeways also should be planned so as to enhance the image of the capital city.

A lot of what has been talked about so far never came to fruition. Specifically, the highway on the eastern side of downtown was met with opposition by the neighbors that would be displaced.

We know the end of the story but I took a few extra steps and wanted to see how things played out during that time by taking a look at old newspaper articles. I’d like to share some excerpts below and you can find the article scans at the bottom.

A 1969 News and Observer article talks about plans to acquire all the property along the North-South Freeway:

City Manager W. H. Carper told the councilmen, city planners and traffic engineers that he thinks the biggest problem of “right-of-way encroachments by developers” will be along the proposed north-south freeway route “between East Street and Bloodworth Street.”

Councilman Seby Jones suggested that “if the city could [illegible] funds perhaps strategic corners of property could be bought along the route.”

“That’s a good idea,” said city traffic engineer Don Blackburn.

Because of a lack of funds, the city is unable to buy the property needed to preserve the rights-of-way for the proposed thoroughfare project.

Thoroughfare Plan Studied by Officials – News and Observer – March 21, 1969.

Planning took years and in 1972, The Society for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood was born. At the time, Raleigh didn’t have any historic preservation districts, something that would certainly change soon after.

Jumping to 1974, I found some articles suggesting that elected officials were strongly against such a highway plan. Although the need, real or not, for more roads into and out of downtown was widely agreed upon, the planning commission was looking for alternatives to the North-South Freeway. When discussing a rezoning case in Oakwood:

Planning Commission member Benjamin B. Taylor said the commission could not plan properly for the Oakwood neighborhood because the City Council has made no “commitment” to the continued existence of Oakwood and has left the proposed expressway in the city’s thoroughfare plan for future construction.

Earlier, commission member Spurgeon Cameron had moved that the commission recommend to the City Council the removal of the North-South Expressway from city road plans.

Cameron said it is “some cold, hard, idiotic planning to leave that in the thoroughfare plan.”

But city planning director A. C. Hall advised the commission that rather than recommending outright removal of the freeway from city plans, a study should be conducted on how to handle the anticipated 35,000 commuters per day who would use the proposed freeway.

Cameron withdrew his proposal but said “we have been subverting people” with the proposed freeway. “People are more important than cars,” he told the commission.

Panel Delays Zoning Action For Oakwood – News and Observer – May 21, 1974

That same year, the Public Works Committee was fully against the highway.

A Raleigh City Council committee Tuesday recommended the junking of plans for the controversial North-South Expressway, which would go through several established neighborhoods.

[…]

Despite strong backing of traffic engineers, the proposed expressway has been the subject of bitter opposition from residents of the Oakwood and Mordecai neighborhoods.

City traffic engineer James D. Blackburn defended the continued presence of the expressway in future city road plans, saying it would be “premature” to remove it.

“No one has ever defined, even in general terms, an alternative to the North-South Expressway,” Blackburn told the committee.

But committee members argued that the price of better downtown access through the expressway was too high if it meant the destruction of neighborhoods.

Panel Moves to Junk Expressway – News and Observer – May 29,1974

It was only a few days later, on June 3,1974, that the Raleigh City Council voted against the expressway. The vote was unanimous.

The Raleigh City Council voted unanimously Monday to kill the major portion of the proposed North-South Freeway because of damage it would cause to existing center city neighborhoods.

The council vote, made with little comment by council members, marks the end of a long fight by residents of the Oakwood and Mordecai neighborhoods near downtown to get the highway link removed from future city road plans.

City Council Kills Planned Road Link – News and Observer – June 4, 1974

All articles are posted at the end including an additional one from May 19, 1975 about Oakwood’s work in becoming Raleigh’s first historic district.

While I’ve read and read about this plan, it is hard to get a sense of just how close we were to actually having this highway on the eastern side of downtown Raleigh. Some older Raleigh residents have told me that a portion of this freeway was indeed built. If you’ve ever exited I-40 at Hammond Road, you have, in fact, driven on a portion of the old North-South Freeway.

Another excerpt from the June 4, 1974 article confirms it:

The council also voted to change the name of the remaining shorter portion of the North-South Freeway, to be located between the proposed Southern Beltline and south to U. S. 70 East. This minor portion would not cut through any existing neighborhoods.

City Council Kills Planned Road Link – News and Observer – June 4, 1974

Notice how Hammond Road awkwardly curves to the west, away from the Bloodworth and East blocks and instead connects to the one-way pairs of Blount and Person.

Today, that wide, six-lane portion of Hammond Road would have been the entrance to the below-grade freeway that could have been.

Articles quoted in this post:

  • News and Observer – March 1, 1969 – pdf
  • News and Observer – May 21, 1974 – pdf
  • News and Observer – May 29, 1974 – pdf
  • News and Observer – June 4, 1974 – pdf
  • News and Observer – May 19, 1975 – pdf

121 Fayetteville Shows Off with 32-story tower, Outdoor Terraces, and More

The Raleigh Appearance Commission is going through the latest project in the works for Fayetteville Street. 121 Fayetteville is a 32-story tower for the 100 block that will bring a variety of uses. I thought this a good time to check out the current setup today and show off some key points from the documents submitted to the commission.

As always, you can dive right into the docs for yourself right here. (pdf link)

The site of the project currently has the Alexander Square parking deck. The deck is located on the northern end of Fayetteville Street and is a privately owned structure with retail spaces along Fayetteville and Wilmington Streets. There are about five-stories of parking with a mix of public spaces and monthly reservations.

The Wells Fargo tower is across the street and the scenic Capitol grounds are nearby. I’m not sure it gets any more prime than this and a tower of this height is in good company with PNC Plaza up the street as well.

Neighbors here include some quality structures from Raleigh’s past including one of my favorites, the Raleigh Masonic Temple building.

The submitted plans and renderings suggest that all or a portion of the Alexander Square parking deck will be removed. The new tower won’t occupy the entire footprint of the property as the southern half will consist of the tower with parking occupying the lower floors of the entire site.

It’s easier to show it rather than describe it.

The document, as well as their main website, mention the following uses for the new tower and parking deck:

  • Retail/restaurant spaces along both Wilmington and Fayetteville Streets.
  • Office space
  • Conference space
  • Outdoor terraces

Looking at the ground floor plan, their is practically continual retail space on the Fayetteville Street side, the rest being lobby space. This is great as Fayetteville should support those higher intense uses and street life.

That’s not to say that Wilmington isn’t getting some activity with some retail, it is, but on this side, there will be entrances/exits for the deck as well as a loading dock. (necessary to support the tower)

There’s no rezoning needed for this project so as these details are ironed out, construction could begin any time. I assume some solid leases will need to be in place so let’s hope the office market bounces back after the pandemic.

A Walk Down New Bern Avenue

The blog and Community tend to focus on new developments in the downtown core, such as 301 Hillsborough or The Willard hotel, that we may be overlooking some other activity just on the outskirts of downtown Raleigh. I thought it time for another Walk Series post to show off the east side of downtown, mainly the New Bern corridor.

The New Bern corridor interests me mainly due to some key observations and upcoming projects:

  • Planned location of the city’s first Bus-Rapid Transit route
  • Increased residential units from new townhome developments
  • Upcoming zoning conversations for the area

Loosely defined, for this Walk post, I’m focused on New Bern and Edenton Streets between Tarboro and East.

BRT Transit is Coming

With the implementation of the 1/2 cent sales tax for transit in 2017, higher-capacity transit, among other improvements, are being planned all over the county. Along New Bern and Edenton Streets, bus-rapid transit (BRT) will be rolling through in a few years if everything stays on schedule.

Being one of four planned BRT routes, high frequency transit will be flowing in and out of downtown Raleigh to the eastern parts of the county. Read more about the plan for BRT here.

The corridor may see dedicated bus lanes, expanded bike lanes, and new sidewalks on both sides of the street. It’s a big upgrade for the same corridor that currently runs the GoRaleigh bus route with the second highest ridership in that transit system.

Tarboro and New Bern/Edenton is loosely planned to get a BRT station on this upgraded route. The next stop inbound would be downtown itself.

Last reported, before the pandemic hit, plans were to be rolling buses in 2023-2024.

From Single-Family to Townhome

Historically, the corridor consists of many larger lots with single-family homes. You can still get a sense of the character going back to the early 1900s with the bungalows and larger houses facing the street.

However, it’s not hard to spot some newer homes, mostly of modern architecture style, sprinkled throughout the area. These homes were popping up between about 2008 until today. These homes add a stark contrast to the area as you can see in the photos.

And if you really look more, the modern townhome seems to be making its way into the corridor as of recently. First, the ten-unit project named 10 Arros completed along New Bern within the last few years. Construction is currently taking place at 625 New Bern where 18 units are planned. Similar modern style as the former.

Finally, across the street from 625 New Bern is Oak City Overlook. This development plans 20 modern townhomes and land has already been cleared at the site.

Could more be coming? I’ve seen plans submitted for more and you have for sale signs like this one at 914 New Bern which advertise, “Townhome/Condo Site for Sale.”

And there’s no shortage of space along this corridor. As I mentioned earlier, the single-family houses are on large lots that could easily be subdivided.

You also have the North Carolina State government vacating a large site at New Bern and Tarboro. The long-time site of the NC DMV is being vacated soon and that’ll put 5.4 acres of land a stone’s throw away from a rapid transit stop. Any development here, plus the adjacent surface parking that supported the NC DMV, could greatly change over if the state decides to sell it.

We also have 8 acres of undeveloped land at New Bern and Swain. Currently, the lot is only partially used by the Exploris school in temporary buildings but 8 acres offers a ton of flexibility, capable of a pretty transformative project. Just look at the map above, it’s that empty lot in the middle. That’s huge!

Zoning it Properly

From my perspective, you have two forces that are about to collide. The development is coming. Should transit only serve the single-family and new, high-end townhomes being built here?

To get more people access to the future transit network, an awkward conversation is soon to come, Raleigh. It’s time to talk about re-zoning the area.

This is a good time to revisit a collaborative post I did about a zoning tool called the Neighborhood Conservation Overlay District (NCOD) and it just so happens that this area has one right in the middle. Below is the New Bern – Edenton NCOD and you can see, almost everything mentioned so far sits right inside it.

In short, the NCOD applies additional restrictions on height, setbacks, and is a tool to encourage new development be consistent with the current character. This NCOD was put in place in 1992.

To make transit more effective, these townhome developments help but we’ll need some larger projects in here to ensure additional office and residential density as they will be within walking distance of a high-frequency bus stop. It is a prime opportunity to get Raleigh residents on a car-less lifestyle at a variety of income levels.

I feel that the NCOD implemented in 1992 needs a revisit and with the current talks of more affordable housing around transit, it would be better to deliver hundreds (thousands?) of new units here rather than status quo townhomes near transit.

The land is still available but the development is starting to pick up. I’m hoping the city can start purchasing land for affordable housing as well as pushing for new zoning updates to match our 2030 and beyond goals as a city.

More conversations on this topic are sure to come.

New Affordable Housing Plans in 2020

Affordable housing isn’t a typical topic of the blog but this year, I’ve been following two initiatives that may provide atypical housing at a lower price point in Raleigh. These include:

  1. The City of Raleigh wants to sell a plot of land in East Raleigh for $1 (one dollar) in exchange for affordable housing.
  2. On election day, you’ll see an option to approve, yes or no, an $80 million housing bond. Jump to more on this on the city’s website.

Lane-Idlewild Affordable Housing

The city wants to leverage over an acre of land on East Lane Street to get some affordable housing units built. The proposal on the table is that the land, valued at over $1.4 million, would be sold for $1 (yes, one dollar) in exchange for more affordable housing.

Click for larger

One of the key criteria here is having at least 51% of the proposed residential units being affordable. In this case, affordable means that it is targeting individuals at the 80% area median income level. (see more about AMI here)

The proposal submission date was in August and the city was flooded with around 32 proposals. This week, the city council moved ahead and the list of applicants has been reduced to four.

Here is a brief overview of the four applications.

Archive Development

  • Rendering shown above
  • proposes 10 lots, each with a duplex and an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU).
  • mix of rental units available to <50-60% AMI, <70-80% AMI and <80-100% AMI
  • affordability preserved for a minimum of 20 years.

CASA

  • proposes 11 rental units across duplexes and quadraplexes
  • all units will be available to <40% AMI
  • tenants will pay a maximum 30% of their income for rent
  • minimum of 30 years of affordability
  • will provide a community garden and on-site management services

Merge Capital

  • proposes a mixture of 44 rental suites and units across detached, attached and ADUs
  • the single-family building types include 1 and 2 bedroom living options arranged as a co-living layout
  • propose a mix of 50% of affordable suites for <50% AMI and 50% for <80% AMI, or 40% of units at <50% AMI and 60% of units at <80% AMI
  • a 25-year initial term of affordability.

Raleigh Area Land Trust

  • proposes 16 Cottage Court units for sale across 8 duplexes
  • propose 50% (8) of the units be sold to <50% AMI
  • 25% (4) units to <60% AMI
  • 25% (4) units at Market Rate.
  • RALT would retain ownership of the land while leasing it to the homeowners through a 99-year, inheritable, renewing ground lease, while limiting equity accrual in order for the homes to be resold to other income-qualifying households.

This is such an interesting project and some good proposals are on the table.

Affordable Housing Bond 2020

With voter approval in November, $80 million would be used to fund affordable housing in a variety of ways. From a July 2020 update, the breakdown of those funds are shown below.

What has me most interested in this bond is that money will go directly into purchasing land around transit. We already know where that land is going to be as we’ve been undergoing a Wake Transit Plan since adoption in 2017. I wouldn’t be surprised if the BRT routes are the areas where land purchasing will take place.

In response to concerns about getting the needs from this bond to the ones that need it most, those at the lowest income scale in Raleigh, I’d like to borrow Councilor Melton’s update after the council’s September 1 meeting.

We also adopted the recommendation to produce more housing units affordable at 30% area median income (AMI). At the meeting this week, staff presented policy recommendations for producing more housing affordable at 30% AMI.

Staff recommended allocating $10 million from the bond funds for permanent supportive housing for very low income (30% AMI or lower) chronically homeless individuals, $10 million from the bond funds for non-profit partners to create or preserve small scale projects where not less than one-third of total units serve 30% AMI or lower, and $8 million from the bond funds plus regulatory incentives for new rental developments where not less than 20% of the units are affordable for not less than 30 years. Staff also recommended requiring 25% of units in 9% tax credit projects and 10% of units in 4% tax credit projects to target creating housing affordable at 30% AMI.

We voted to adopt and approve all of these recommendations.

9/1/2020 meeting summary: Affordable Housing Bond, micromobility (scooters!), big rezoning – link

It’s a pretty large initiative that certainly attempts to close the gap on Raleigh’s housing needs and deserves your consideration when voting this Fall.