7 Comments

  1. This is an outstanding vision and I am confident that things will go well. The developer has scaled up significantly, but he has the financial backing and a good record of delivering the goods. Most important, he is not a cocky developer, which leads me to believe that this project may grow bigger with time ;)

  2. I’m glad the hotel component is still a big part of it…definitely a good site for one, right between the convention center, memorial auditorium and city market.

    Also neat how existing businesses (Coopers for example) will be incorporated into the new complex.

  3. I’m actually really interested to see how Cooper’s and Reliable Loan will be thrown into this. The transition could really hurt them.

  4. Finally!!! A little vision. This should now be the minimum size of this project no matter how long it takes, at no time should this be scaled back. I would prefer to see the two taller towers over 40, do not understand why developers are not targeting over 40 or 50 stories (the two taller towers should not be at the same height, would prefer a 50 and 44 – at these heights, this project would be a cornerstone for future taller development).

    Bottom line, this is moving in the right direction. It should be taller, but the initial design is a very good start. This design would be worthy of NY or Chicago (but again, could be taller)

  5. I think they look terrific. Gregg has said that he would look to go taller if the demand was there, so let’s keep our fingers crossed for taller plans. Regardless, he has definitely set a new standard for new DTR development! Allowing Coopers and Reliable Loan to reenter is definitely like what Hatem allowed with Capitol Barber at the Heilig-Levine building after its full-scale renovation. It is great to see Raleigh preserve its soul.

  6. Gregg has definitely been a downtown believer… I felt really bad when he had to scale down the Dawson, from 15 floors to 5 :( The West At North, on the other hand, went through a scale up. So did The Edison, and I am sure that the taller components will be scaled up if demand exists. Now, we need both the developer and the city to focus on attracting 1-2 major corporations, as well as a few big hotel chains.

  7. I think this is exciting news. Like others mentioned I am glad to see these two long time family owned businesses be folded into future plans.
    What no one seems to have mentioned is the fate of Isaac’s Menswear. The building they occupy is owned by Progress Energy, so it’s not like they had any sort of bargaining power. The owner was quoted in the N&O (http://www.newsobserver.com/104/story/498093.html) in ’06 as saying:

    Despite the uncertainty, Rokach is sure of one thing: If he does have to move, he’s not staying downtown. “All the moms and pops are not going to stay here any longer,” he said. “What they’re after, they call it progress, is the big restaurants and the big buildings and the newer money.

    “The downtown of today, for me, is not the downtown that I knew three or four years ago.”

    Personally, I welcome the downtown of today. He is right in that only 4 years ago it was quite different than it is now. I still find it sad with a few notable exceptions, the mom and pops that weathered downtown when it wasn’t in demand will continue to be pushed out. I also think that it’s important to remember we’re losing more and more of the historically African-American part of Wilmington Street.

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