Davie Street Presbyterian Church Expansion High-Level Plans

Davie Street Presbyterian Church. April 2018.

I found myself walking down Person Street one day and saw an excavator hacking at the Davie Street Presbyterian Church. As I do, I was curious what work was going on at this corner of east downtown.

From submitted plans on the city’s website, it looks like the is adding to their location. With a small back room being demolished, new space will be added here and throughout some of the surface parking lot along Person Street.

Map of the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian.

Map of the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian. Click for larger.

The churches in downtown have done a great job, probably the best job, of keeping their additions within character while using modern materials so I expect this new addition to match nicely with the historic sanctuary. Of course, I love to see surface parking eaten up for more people-centric uses.

Rendering the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian.

Rendering the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian. Click for larger.

Rendering the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian.

Rendering the new addition for Davie Street Presbyterian. Click for larger.

P.S. I have a growing affinity for the architecture of some of the churches in East Raleigh. It mainly comes from these crenulated towers. I’d love to work with someone with a better eye and love of Raleigh history to tell a story behind these. Examples include Gethsemane True Vine Holiness Church, Revelation Missionary Baptist Church, and Rush Metropolitan AME Zion.

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16 Comments

  1. Glad to hear that they are expanding as I thought that they had sold and were moving? Probably thinking of another downtown church on the West side…

  2. Well, Google is no help if you search for House of Swank…they park their truck off Bloodworth between Martin and Davis. The church faces East Street, between Martin and Davie.

  3. Last post RE this….there are a good dozen churches over on this side of town, but I count 5 that are of similar architecture and vintage as the one Leo posted about. It gives you some idea what a strong amazing community east Raleigh was back in this era. If you want to go on a walking tour, they are Rush Metropolitan AME Zion (
    Cabarrus St), Revelation Missionary Baptist (Davie), Gethsemane True Vine Holiness (Martin in front of the shopping center), Mt Sinai Holy Church of America (Martin/Swain), and Trinity United (State St across from DMV). Here is Revelation for a taste. https://www.google.com/maps/@35.7752408,-78.6260892,3a,75y,34.63h,92.36t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sdFiT9NCVjSoYklUkPh257Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

  4. Churches, like all other existing landowners, have rights with respect to land that they acquired fair-and-square on the open market — even if it happened decades ago. Any attempt to force them to sell or to run them out of downtown by adverse zoning, etc would surely be struck down by the courts as unconstitutional. Besides, it would be politically unthinkable.

    City centers in London, Paris, Russia, Rome, Buenos Aires, etc are full of churches. In Tokyo, temples are everywhere. No one seems to mind.

  5. A part of me isn’t that upset over the sprawl-inducing Infosys announcement last year moving on. This one, like others, really feels like a PR move to get govs to bend over with incentives. HQ2 being the best example.

    We may not have lost anything to begin with cause they were never that committed to the triangle anyway it looks like.

  6. @Leo Yea this seems like the 2,000 job expansion is still on and that this training center would have been in addition to that.

    Am I right, here?

  7. Much to bland, like most of there portfolio. Looks
    like everything else they have built, which is mostly
    in Boston.
    The 2 Charlotte projects are awful.

  8. So it’s kind of strange for Fallon to use the Lundy rendering if it wasn’t possibly going to build the same structure?

  9. I like the churches, it adds some history and character to downtown. Plenty of cities have built up around their churches while still preserving them, Boston and Philly are prime examples.

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